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A Fable about Another Family

Out of concern for the homeless hungry, Cornelius Percy, a successful persimmon farmer, donates a significant portion of every year's crop of the delicious, golden fruits to soup kitchens and free pantries in his community. Each time he drops off produce he jokes to that charity's chief cook, "You know this was Adam's apple a day to keep them damned doctors away."

To which one fellow, a shy man with a husky whisper always replies, "You never know, man. You never know."

Candice, Mr. Percy's wife of eleven years, makes a good business selling imported caps, hats, head scarves, and cheap though pretty Chinese knock-off watches out of a one-door storefront in a less than classy section of town where bolder tourists dare to roam. An ardent conservationist, rain or shine, Candice rides a red-fendered single-geared bicycle to and from her workplace.

Nancy, their nineteen-year old daughter, is a single-minded gamer whose playing handle is Domina Doris. She dropped out of college to pursue an ambition of producing the goriest slaughter score ever in the latest edition of a game named 'Deliver & Die.' She is a slim, attractive, light-complexioned young woman with an easy smile and a penchant for black clothing. She loves showers for the feel of warm water moving over naked skin.

The family meets once a week on Sunday mornings to catch up on relevant matters. They have orderly meetings, take detailed minutes which are routinely followed through. They make a point not to quarrel or complain, and support each other with comfort, humor, or any way else they can.

Keeping to this pattern, the family remains wholesome and happy.

Moral: Beneficence begins with Sunday breakfasts